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writing

Microfiction: Lucien & Aldous #4

“I’ve always preferred the eighty-nines myself.” Aldous announced with a noticeable slur. “A more full-bodied vintage for the true sanguinarian.”

Lucien picked a shred of flesh from his teeth with a fingernail. The nail was long and scarlet and didn’t belong to him.

“Aldous, you are such a snob.” He muttered.

Flash Fiction: The Gluemn In God’s Eye

For years I’ve been fascinated by the idea that life may exist under the icy crust of Jupiter’s moon, Europa. In particular I wondered how an intelligent species might mythologise their landscape when the limit of their universe is a miles thick ceiling of ice. This is a glimpse in to life beneath a frozen ocean.

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Microfiction: A Walk In Whitechapel

In response to a one word writing prompt: liminal

Whitechapel is never silent. The ghosts of two millenia crowd the lanes, beckoning, with crimson allure from shadowed doorways, calling to you in brash Cockney from long dismantled stalls. They grasp at your feet as you stroll, oblivious over their plague-rotted remains.

Microfiction: The Secret Life of Tom Scruple

Inspired by a one word writing prompt: fastidious.

“Is that a smudge?” Mr Arfwick went quite pink.

“Erm…” Tom stammered for a response.

His boss decided not to wait for one.

“Here at Nitpicker & Scruple we believe in fastidious accounting. Start again!”

Tom trudged away. Why had he let his father talk him out of being a pirate?

Microfiction: There’s No ‘I’ In Team

For the #SockItTueMe writing challenge on Twitter.

“Cover us!” Yelled Agent C, as he and Agent D ran for the chopper.

“I thought we were in this together!” Said Agent I, drawing his gun.

“We are!” Agent D threw herself through the chopper’s open door and signaled the pilot to take off. “But there’s no I in this Team”

The Right Tool For The Job: Dabble Writer

When I signed up for NaNoWriMo last year I decided to take a chance on a brand new writing platform. I had tried several, including Scrivener (too complicated), Apollopad (unreliable), and one which was so relentlessly awful I can’t being myself to name and shame it.

As I write in various locations and on several different devices, my main priority was finding a platform that allowed me to save my work to a remote server, something I had been waiting in vain for Scrivener to provide for years.

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